The position of your new conservatory or orangery can have a great effect on the atmosphere it creates in your home.

North-facing conservatories and orangeries

Based on the compass points in the UK, north-facing conservatories and orangeries generally receive less direct sunlight than south-facing conservatories. This can be an advantage in the summer because they are much less likely to overheat than south-facing conservatories and, therefore, will probably require a simple and moderately priced ventilation system.

That said, in winter, north-facing conservatories tend to be, unsurprisingly, much cooler than south-facing ones and may have problems associated with damp and moisture. This means that you would need to consider what ventilation system will be the most effective. In addition, north-facing conservatories greatly benefit from double or triple glazing and an effective heating system.

South-facing conservatories and orangeries

In the summer, south-facing conservatories and orangeries can overheat and reach uncomfortably high temperatures, particularly without adequate ventilation (like windows and roof vents) or blinds. Apparently, solar control glazing is also highly recommended for south-facing conservatories and orangeries.

East-Facing Conservatories and Orangeries

East-facing conservatories and orangeries get the best of the early morning sun and, as a result, can make great rooms for use in the morning (if you have time to spare anyway!).

West-facing conservatories and orangeries

A west-facing conservatory or orangery is, ultimately, opposite to east-facing ones in that they provide sunlight on bright afternoons rather than in the mornings. As a result, west-facing conservatories may need to be heated in the morning and ventilated later on in the afternoon and evening, depending on the time of year.

You will also want to consider whether your conservatory or orangery will be positioned at the front or the back of your property. If it is positioned at the back, then you will need to consider the access into your property from the back entrance and, particularly, whether all required materials for your new extension can fit through the house.

If your new conservatory is positioned at the front, you should consider whether it is on a main road and any further permission you may need in order to build it. Wherever your conservatory is positioned though, you will need to ensure you adhere to building regulations and get planning permission if required.